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Chart of the week: Fake news and how it's perceived

“The Trump campaign has confirmed to Hannity.com that Mr. Trump did indeed send his plane to make two trips from North Carolina to Miami, Florida to transport over 200 Gulf War Marines back home.” The story posted in May 2016 was a fake.

Trump never sent his plane to bail out the soldiers in 1991, after they had returned home from the first Gulf War. However 49 percent of respondents asked in December 2016 by Ipsos thought this was probably very accurate.

Another fake story originated on the satirical website WTOE 5 News in July 2016. The headline read: “Pope Francis shocks world, endorses Donald Trump for President, releases statement.” This, of course, wasn’t true either. Still, 28 percent of the 3,015 respondents thought this very likely might have been the case.

While many people state that they’d be able to spot a fake in the news, actually it seems to be harder than many think.

Fake news: how it's perceived ()

Download the chart here.

Source: Statista

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