Quantcast
return Home

Trends industry leaders are thinking about for the future

Artificial Intelligence, voice, AR/VR, events, and international expansion – these are some of the things that have industry leaders thinking as they contemplate the future and growth for their businesses.

 

AI header ()

 

In the lead up to the FIPP World Congress, here is a selection of leaders sharing their views on future trends, emerging tech and growth areas for their specific businesses. Hear more from them at the Congress, 9-11 October, in London. 

Josh Macht, Group Publisher for the Harvard Business Review Group

There is a range of trends that I’ll try to organise for the Congress, but let’s just cover a couple. One is artificial intelligence and augmented reality/virtual reality. I am interested in robotics and how that manifests itself with things like self-driving cars. These are trends that I think media and education need to be anticipating, because they’re happening already. 

 
HBR Josh Macht ()
 

Can we start to think about the HBR archives in ways that we can use machines to get smart, for example? How can those archives, powered by machines, really serve a CEO? That’s where all of a sudden trends come together. 

Are there virtual worlds where we can bring people together? For instance, we do something called the HBR ‘How I did it’ feature, which is part of the magazine. So can we have the CEO talk with an editor using VR? Imagine if that CEO is talking about his or her business and we can bring the audience into their business, to show them the shop floor, to talk about an issue the audience is really dealing with. 

These are trends that are happening right now and it’s incumbent upon the media company and HBR to find really lean and low-cost ways to learn as much as possible about where our future customer is heading. 

James Wildman, UK CEO at Hearst

I think some of the emerging disruptive technologies such as voice-activated products – like Amazon’s Alexa – are creating a range of exciting opportunities for media companies like Hearst. 

 
James Wildman article header ()
 

In the US, Alexa users can hear daily snippets of wisdom from Oprah Winfrey, which is a brilliant innovation. 

I’m also very interested in what our clients are saying to us about their concerns about the ‘flight to quality’ as they seek to improve online brand safety. 

Lucy Küng, advisor, professor, board member and author focused on strategy, innovation, and mastering digitalisation

We have reached the end of the digital beginning for the media. The Internet is two decades old. ‘New’ media is no longer new, and the contours of the digital media industry are becoming clear. 

 
Lucy Kung header ()
 

The platforms are here – and they are a classic ‘gravity problem’, that is not really a problem at all, but a fact of life that must be dealt with. The industry knows now more or less what its ‘ur-challenges’ are and can start to optimize itself for this environment. 

The ongoing stream of ‘shiny new things’ will not cease – depending on who you talk to today it includes from video, machine learning, notifications, AR, VR and Amazon Echo. Intelligent processes need to be designed to master the decisions that arise in connection with them. 

Geoff Ramsey, co-founder and chief innovation officer of eMarketer

We’re spending a lot of time with product development, trying to think of how we can arrange our forecasts so that people who have a subscription can go in and call up specific charts or have charts essentially custom-built before their eyes – by selecting the metrics they want and the countries they’re interested in. So there are all kinds of things that we can do to use the technology that we write about in our own reports. 

 
Geoff Ramsay ()
 

Creating video segments is an example of another way young people might want to consume our reports. So there are lots of exciting opportunities from a product standpoint. 

One of the reasons we chose Axel Springer (as an investor) is that they’re very strong in Germany and Western Europe, and that’s where we’re trying to grow our business. We’re strong in the US, strong in Canada, strong in the UK, but then there’s the rest of Western Europe. Asia is also a territory we haven’t begun to really tackle yet. So there are lots and lots of white space ahead of us. 

Adweek’s Jeff Litvack, whose colleague Lisa Granatstein, editor and VP of content and events, will speak at the Congress

We are focused on three main trends right now. The first is events. We’ve not traditionally been an event business, but we’ve got plans on that front. In terms of the value chain, events are really where it’s at.  Traditionally, media companies have been very successful in branding and they’ve been good at lead gen, but we want to get to the point where we’re facilitating a handshake. So we’re going to do that through thought leadership events as well as through what we call hosted-buyer events, which we’re very excited about it. 

 
Jeff Litvak Adweek ()
 

The second thing is gaining a deeper understanding of our audience and first-party data, which I think is something that all media companies are suffering from a lack of. We’re making a big investment in account-based marketing and data capabilities to tie together digital and events so that we can say ‘hey, we’re going to invite these people to get in the room with you and really pull it all together across channels’. 

The third piece for us is really around subject matter expertise. The world is getting more complex and there are more things happening in the adtech/martech space. We’re restructuring to put forth a deeper voice, a voice that has more analysis, and a voice that can really bring the leaders together through a combination of journalism and industry experts, which goes back to that community idea.

More like this

[Congress speaker Q&A] How Harvard Business Review is embracing the future

[Congress speaker Q&A] Four dimensions of successful media organisational change

[Congress speaker Q&A] How Adweek is evolving to meet new audience demands

Geoff Ramsey on the most impactful media-tech trends today

[Congress speaker Q&A] Building a subscription-driven business from the ground up

New Hearst UK CEO’s strategy for success

Top tips for transformation

  • How a ‘digital guy’ ended up running a fast-growing print paper

    We speak to The New European’s editor, Matt Kelly, on pop up publishing, identity media and how a ‘digital guy’ has ended up helming this year’s most noteworthy print success.

    18th Oct 2017 Features
  • New skills will drive future publishing - FIPP chairman

    Without bringing newly skilled people into newsrooms, publishers will not succeed in the future. This was the stark warning delivered by Ralph Büchi, COO of the Ringier Group, CEO of Ringier Axel Springer Switzerland and newly elected chairman of FIPP, the network for global media.

    16th Oct 2017 Features
  • Monetising video: a work in progress

    One of the topics under investigation at this year’s FIPP World Congress in London was the term ‘pivot to video’ and whether, given the relative cost of producing video content off extremely low CPMs (some as low as 15 US cents), pursuing a video strategy one that is paying off for content owners.

    16th Oct 2017 Features
  • Proof that magazine media still deliver the best results for advertisers

    Magazines are a shortcut to quality and continues to deliver top results for advertisers, according to Linda Thomas Brooks, CEO at MPA, USA, said during a keynote on the second day of the FIPP World Congress in London (11 October) last week.

    16th Oct 2017 Features
Go to Full Site